Bandura- Enactive Attainments:

Enactive attainments reference the “personal accomplishments” that individuals achieve (Martinez, 2013, p. 175). I believe students need to embrace this concept when learning new material. As students gain confidence by reflecting on successful completion of coursework, instructors can promote their self-efficacy. An approach I would take as a teacher to increase self-efficacy is hands-on learning. The beneficial component for this strategy is to create the opportunity for success (Hebert, Kulkin, & Ahn, 2014). By allowing the students to the chance to complete a tangible task successfully, the overall morale is improved and self-efficacy is demonstrated.

Bandura- Verbal Persuasion:

Verbal persuasion is the confirmation by a respectable party that we should desire of our own person (Martinez, 2013). I think this is especially important in self-efficacy because we need instructors to state their belief in the student to do better. As an accomplished professional, instructors ‘carry weight’ with discussing the opinion of what a student is capable of, and students will listen. To promote this part of self-efficacy, I would speak to each students and make sure that their strengths are known and how these skills can contribute to a successful career later in life and in the classroom setting.

Critical Thinking VS Problem Solving:

Both problem solving and critical thinking are critical to accomplishing one another. However, there are differences between the two. With problem solving, this finding a solution(s) to any set of problems that can be challenging. In critical thinking, we collect information via research or observatory to make a conclusive decision about an issue.

Two Ways to Promote Critical Thinking:

Teachers can utilize skills to assist students with developing this manner of thinking. One way as a teacher I may encourage this thinking is creating lesson plans that do not circulate around memorization but asking questions to promote critical thinking (Snyder & Snyder, 2008). Snyder & Snyder (2008) state,” To support this premise, focused attention needs to be placed on the application content, the process of learning, and methods of assessment (p.91). The second way to teach critical thinking is to model this behavior. Students are not born with critical thinking skills and need appropriate directions to demonstrate how this is to be achieved (Snyder & Snyder, 2008). Weaving this approach in the classroom can increase or promote critical thinking skills from the instructor.

Hebert, C., Kulkin, H., & Ahn, B. (2014). Facilitating Research Self-Efficacy Through Teaching Strategies Linked to Self-Efficacy Theory. American International Journal of Social Science. Volume 3(1). 44-48.

Martinez, M. (2013). Learning and Cognition: The Design of the Mind. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson

Snyder, L. & Snyder, M. (2008). Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills. The Delta Pi Epsilon Journal. Volume L(2). 90-97.

 

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